Myofascial Pain Syndrome and Fibromyalgia

Are two separate disorders but both are chronic conditions that affect the fascia that cover the muscles.

Treating the Syndromes

Myofascial Pain Syndrome's true cause is unknown but commonly develops from a previous muscle injury or from excessive strain on a particular muscle or group of muscles or lack of activity as in the case of a broken arm in a cast.  It is therefore asymmetric and localized to a specific body area.  Fibromyalgia is typically diffuse and involves may areas within the body at the same time and on both sides.  The cause is also unknown.  Both syndromes are often associated with depression, poor sleep patterns, or stressful life situations.


Both syndromes are associated with chronic muscle pain and specific trigger or tender points with or without muscle spasms.  Pain is usually worse after excessive exercise and stiffens up with inactivity.  Pain can range from mild to excruciating.  Knots or tender spots may be felt just beneath the skin.  Pain does not resolve on it's own with home care of ice, heat or rest.

 

Diagnosis is able to be done in the doctor's office without expensive tests.  Treatment is multifaceted and usually involves co-treatment with other healthcare practitioners. Sleep patterns need to be addressed as well as mental health. 

Here to help

While the underlying problems and sequelae of myofascial pain can be complex, a complete diagnosis will not only seek to address the pain, but aid in the treatment as well.  Treatment may include lifestyle changes, exercises, and adjustments as well as co-treatment with other healthcare practitioners. Contact us to schedule a consultation.